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Link
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shougong:

A Miao woman cutting a paper cut for embroidery from Tribal Textiles

Asian History

(via asianhistory)

Source: shougong
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NYC GOV: Let's Grow Together Contest

nycgov:

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NYC tech startup, On Deck Capital, is running a contest to celebrate the opening of its new NYC headquarters.  The contest will connect one deserving New York City-based small business with $10,000.  All you have to do is describe in 100 words or less how the money would help your business grow. Applications are accepted through April 11th.  The top 5 finalists will be put up to a vote.  The business with the most votes wins $10,000, second most gets $5,000 and third prize is a free consultation with an On Deck member.  

To enter visit On Deck’s Facebook: http://bit.ly/YhTjcY

select your borough Iamjimuelarceo Inc.

(via nycedc)

Source: nycgov
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fools day

fools day

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poetrybomb:

Abrams Books and Tumblr are celebrating National Poetry Month with a month-long Poetry Bomb! Join us by reading, reblogging, submitting your own poetry, or meeting us IRL on April 30th at Housing Works Bookstore Cafe.

(via staff)

Source: poetrybomb
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centuriespast:

Buddha Shakyamuni
India, Bihar; Pala period (c.8th - 12th century), late 9th - early 10th century
The Asia Society

centuriespast:

Buddha Shakyamuni

India, Bihar; Pala period (c.8th - 12th century), late 9th - early 10th century

The Asia Society

(via asianhistory)

Source: centuriespast
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Is this a zombie or what @iamjimuelarceo Inc.

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1ucasvb:

The familiar trigonometric functions can be geometrically derived from a circle. But what if, instead of the circle, we used a regular polygon? In this animation, we see what the “polygonal sine” looks like for the square and the hexagon. The polygon is such that the inscribed circle has radius 1. (There’s a very neat reason for this.) Since these polygons are not perfectly symmetrical like the circle, the function will depend on the orientation of the polygon. More on this subject and derivations of the functions can be found in this other post
Now you can also listen to what these waves sound like
This technique is general for any polar curve. Here’s a heart’s sine function, for instance

1ucasvb:

The familiar trigonometric functions can be geometrically derived from a circle. But what if, instead of the circle, we used a regular polygon? In this animation, we see what the “polygonal sine” looks like for the square and the hexagon. The polygon is such that the inscribed circle has radius 1. (There’s a very neat reason for this.) Since these polygons are not perfectly symmetrical like the circle, the function will depend on the orientation of the polygon. More on this subject and derivations of the functions can be found in this other post

Now you can also listen to what these waves sound like

This technique is general for any polar curve. Here’s a heart’s sine function, for instance

Source: 1ucasvb